Help! Help Help! and CHEAT: Getting Assistance on Bloomberg

The Bloomberg Terminal System is a powerful information tool. With power comes a necessary level of complexity. Fortunately, Bloomberg has several ways to help solve our searching problems.

HelpHELP

Type a keyword into the command line (e.g. average weighted cost of capital) and hit the <HELP> key. Or, hit a function key (such as EQUITIES) followed by the <HELP> key. Depending on the keywords for which you are searching, the screen may present definitions, FAQs, functions or news.

The screen below shows the results of typing the phrase Average Weighted Cost of Capital and hitting the <HELP> key.

Help screen

Helpx2HELP HELP

Update: Live Chat is no longer available

Hit the <HELP> key twice to initiate a Live Chat with a Bloomberg representative. The “live assistance” service is available 24/7.  In my experience, the people staffing the Bloomberg help line are invariably fast, polite and expert. If the answer to your question is too complicated to be easily conveyed by Chat, the Bloomberg rep will give you a call and walk you through the procedure.

For a detailed record of your previous requests. Type: HDSK <GO>. Mousing over the individual requests will display the entire chat transaction.

Help desk past questions

CHEAT

Type CHEAT <GO> (or just CHEA) to call up a menu of Bloomberg Cheatsheets.

cheat

Clicking on a topic will bring up one or more PDF documents giving details on using many of the Bloomberg modules.

New Bloomberg modules may have a tab “View Cheatsheet”. Bloomberg’s recent Private Equity/Private Company module (Type PE <GO> for access) is an example.

Speaking of new Bloomberg modules, type NEW <GO> for a list of “What’s New In Bloomberg”:

New in Bloomberg (1)

For information on accessing Bloomberg, see our FAQ and our Bloomberg Help Guide.

2 thoughts on “Help! Help Help! and CHEAT: Getting Assistance on Bloomberg

  1. Pingback: Bloomberg help changes | Business Research Plus

  2. Pingback: Bloomberg Live Help Discontinued | Datapoints: A blog from the Lippincott Library of the Wharton School of Business

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