Bloomberg Cuts through the Government Contract Maze

Bloomberg’s Government Spending module <BGS> is an important new tool designed to measure the effect of US contracts on a company’s outlook. Based on data from the 500 largest US Federal Government contract holders, the module displays prime contract orders for a company based on obligations posted by U.S. Federal Agencies. Details provided include key statistics, contract portfolio analysis, peer comparisons and quarterly trends.

To get access, type the ticker symbol into the command line, hit the Equity key, type BGS and hit Go. To search for Boeing’s US Government Contracts for example:

 BA US <EQUITY>  BGS  <GO>    

Blog contract first screen

The tabs on the Overview Table allow the examination of different aspects of a company’s contracts. The “Contract Analysis” tab, for example, lists Boeing’s individual Government Contracts by their value, Government Agency, and start and end dates.

Blog contract screen 2

For a list of the companies receiving US Government Contracts, type:

 BGSD <Go>

Blog contract screen 3

For more information on doing business with the U.S. Government and with individual states, see this FAQ.

 

What’s the Deal? Researching Specific M&A Deals

Companies make acquisitions for two primary reasons: (1) to fill a strategic gap (products, resources (people), or capabilities) or (2) enable the company to enter a new market with a new revenue stream. Researching a company’s M&A activity provides insight into the corporate strategy. When researching a specific deal, we are often looking for deal financials and deal valuation. It’s also important to research the strategies behind the deal. We often want information on business drivers, overall strategy, execution plan, implementation, etc.

Let’s take a well-known deal as an example, eBay’s acquisition of Paypal. In 2002, eBay, the largest online auction platform bought, PayPal, a web-based payment service, for $1.5B. The deal was a perfect match – Paypal drove eBay’s revenues while eBay supported the growth of PayPal’s active user base. A decade later, it is evident that both businesses fueled each others growth. So how does one research a specific deal?

Start with Thomson One for deal information including deal financials, news, filings, and research.

Note that this database only works in Internet Explorer versions 7-9. Take a look at our blog post for an IE10 workaround or Chrome plug-in.

Go to Screening & Analysis => Deals & League Tables => M&A => Advanced Search. Continue reading

Do You Have This Report? Finding Market and Industry Reports

Doing research on an industry? The Library has several databases that can help. Most Library resources can be accessed by typing the database name into the Findit box at the top of the Library homepage.

Standard&Poors

Net Advantage – Standard & Poors has been providing industry surveys since 1941. Older, print editions are available at Lippincott Library – Peck Collection (call number HG4921 .S672).  Recent years are available electronically. Once you are logged into the database, click on the Industries Tab. While coverage is mostly limited to the U.S. there are some international reports as well. The reports include industry profiles, trends, how the industry operates, key ratios, and how to analyze a company in this industry. Comparative company analysis is also available for industry leaders.

MoodysRatingsResearch_edited

Moody’s Analytics examines industries from the standpoint of the bond markets. Not only does Moody’s provide very detailed reports on their methodologies for rating bonds in a particular industry, it also provides industry outlooks explaining what industry trends will affect the bond markets. Coverage is international in scope. Both types of reports provide deep insight into what is needed for an industry to thrive and what companies in that industry have the strongest potential for investment.Combined_2

Navigate using the Ratings and Research Tab. Next in the middle column, select Research Type and then choose Industry/Sector Research or Methodologies.

Use the filters on the left of the screen to limit to Corporates (under Market Segment) and then select an industry from the Market Segment filter. These are listed in alphabetical order. Continue reading

Finding and Using Online Images – Creative Commons

Windwärts Energie GmbH / Photographer: Mark Mühlhaus/attenzione

Windwärts Energie GmbH / Photographer: Mark Mühlhaus/attenzione

A picture is worth a thousand words. Especially when you only have 5 minutes to make a compelling presentation. Using an image to support your point can be an effective way to cut down on the text of your Powerpoint. So where can you find good quality images that are free to use?

Finding non-copyrighted images can be challenging since in the United States when you take a picture, you automatically get the copyright to that photo. We are used to searching Google for everything, but not every image on Google is under a Creative Commons (CC) license. For presentations and other non-commercial projects, you will want to find images with a Creative Commons (CC) license, which means you can use the image without seeking permission. For Coursera lectures, you’ll need to find Creative Commons images that are licensed for commercial use.

Windwärts Energie GmbH / Photographer: Mark Mühlhaus/attenzione

Below are a couple of suggestions for finding images that are under a Creative Commons license. For a more complete overview of open access images, see the Penn Libraries’ Finding Open Access Images Research Guide. Even though an image is under CC, you will still want to attribute the photo to its creator.

Flickr, the online photo Continue reading

Thomson One & Browser Compatibility: Using Chrome and Firefox

Students who use Thomson One are already familiar with its quirks. The database only runs properly using Internet Explorer, and works best in older versions (7-9). There is a workaround for IE10, using the compatibility feature, which we discuss in our previous post. For those without Internet Explorer there is another option. The IE Tab extension allows your Chrome or Firefox browser to act like IE, which allows you to access Thomson One using one of those browsers (for Windows only). 

Note that we were unable to download analyst reports using the IE Tab extension in Chrome. Other functionality such as exporting data to Excel was successful.

Download the IE Tab extension from the Chrome Web Store or from Firefox Add-ins. We tested the extension using Chrome. IE Tab 1

When IE Tab is added to your Chrome browser, it will appear as an icon next to Settings.

IE Tab 2

To access Thomson One. Search for Thomson One in the FindIt box on the Lippincott Library homepage. Right-click on the link to Thomson One under E-Resources. Hold your cursor over IE Tab Options and select Open in IE Tab.

IE Tab 3

Log into the database with your PennKey and Password.

IE Tab 4

The only functionality that the IE Tab extension does not allow is downloading analyst reports. We received an error message every time we tried to download analyst reports, but let us know if you have better results.

For more on accessing Thomson One see:

Thomson One & Browser Compatibility: The Case of IE10

Wrestling with Analyst Reports: A Guide to Downloading from Thomson One