Untangling the (Supply) Chains: Part 1

From a business perspective, the global pandemic has exposed shortcomings in supply chains within and across industries throughout the world. Supply chain research reveals gaps that equate to opportunities for interested businesses. Lippincott Library offers several resources for supply chain research, each with unique features.

Capital IQ

Remotely accessible to full-time MBA students through the MBA Career Management portal and to all others through Penn Libraries, Capital IQ features current and historical business customer and supplier information for companies and their subsidiaries. Details include customer/supplier name, relationship type, primary industry, and link to the information source.

  • Search by company name to retrieve a Company Profile
  • In the left-side menu, navigate to Business Relationships and select Customers or Suppliers

Here is a partial list of Tesla’s Recently Disclosed Suppliers from Capital IQ:

Capital IQ screenshot of Tesla's Recently Disclosed Suppliers

FactSet

Visit Lippincott Library to access FactSet, a powerful financial and economic database that includes current supply chain information provided by Revere. Covering more than 150,000 relationships, this data provides insight into company supply chains, key customers, suppliers, competitors, and strategic partners. Annual review based on SEC filings keeps this information updated.

FactSet Revere Supply Chain Relationships data is also available on the Wharton Research Data Services (WRDS) platform. This data covers more than 25,000 publicly traded companies around the world and select subsidiaries, representing more than 144,000 business relationships, with historical data back to 2003.

Panjiva

Panjiva is a global supply chain intelligence database containing eight million companies and more than one billion shipment records, with more than 200 countries represented. Included transactional and macro data cover 35% and 95% of global trade flows, respectively. Information is sourced from bill of lading shipment records from U.S Customs and Border Protection, credit information providers, compliance organizations, trade associations, and more. Current and historical information is available.

Search for a company or product name and filter to buyers, suppliers, or shipments, or search product trends. Buyer and Supplier profiles feature top products, countries, shipment records, trading partners, ports and carriers, where applicable, and an Activity Feed featuring new supply chain activity. Corporate hierarchy and contact information are also provided.

To create a Trend report, select a country/region, trade direction (import or export), and a product’s Harmonized System (HS) code.

Panjiva Trends Report header: HS Code 9560.70.40.00
Panjiva Trends Report: Top Global Suppliers for HS Code 9560.70.40.00

Use the Macro tool to analyze trade flows of products between countries. Panjiva Macro data is sourced from UN Comtrade, which obtains the data from each country’s government.

Bloomberg

Bloomberg makes it possible to analyze current and historical supply chain relationships for approximately 23,000 public companies and 96,000 private companies worldwide, representing 900,000 global supply chain relationships. 

Data come from public sources including company reports, conference call transcripts, and regulatory filings, as well as customers and suppliers. This bi-directional data and estimates from industry analysts quantify company exposures from both production and demand sides of the supply chain. The resulting 200,000 quantified supplier-customer relationships include both revenue and cost percentages and links to company filings.

Use the function SPLC to access and analyze supply chain data on the Bloomberg Terminal. Below is an analysis of absolute projected sales growth for companies in Ford Motor Company’s supply chain:

screenshot of Bloomberg's supply chain analysis of Ford Motor Company reflecting absolute projected sales growth percentages

For additional recommendations, refer to our Business FAQ “Where can I find information on a company’s supply chain management?” or contact a Lippincott Librarian.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this post highlighting reports useful for supply chain research.

What did they say? Resources for transcripts and audios of Earnings Calls.

Earnings calls are conference calls or webcasts at which a public company’s management team discusses the company’s financial performance from the previous reporting period (usually a quarter). Participants include investors, financial analysts, and others, including shareholders. Reading transcripts from these earnings calls and listening to audio recordings can be a great way to glean information about a company’s performance and plans for its future directly from the company leaders themselves.

Presentation

While archival transcripts of calls can be easy to find, audio broadcasts of earnings calls can sometimes be more challenging to find. Often, companies will only make them available for a limited amount of time following the actual earnings call. If you wish to listen to the broadcast, you will need to keep track of when a particular company’s earnings calls are and how long they make their broadcasts available after the call. For example, Apple only makes their broadcasts available for two weeks after the call. While archives of audio recordings will not be as extensive as those for the written transcripts, you can often find at least the recordings for the last call or two for a given company.

The Lippincott Library has a number of resources where you can access these materials.

Continue reading

I Heard It through the Grape Vine – Sources for M&A Rumors

Rumors surrounding merger negotiations may cause legal problems for the negotiating parties. Information leaked from negotiations can lead to accusations of fraud or of insider trading. Despite their potential danger, M&A rumors appear daily in hundreds of news sources. The Penn Libraries subscribe to several databases that allow you to track M&A rumors, and to find the details of the deals the rumors represent.

Below is a description of the “rumor mills” of five databases that cover M&A deals.

All of the databases described are updated continually, are international in scope and have lengthy historical files. The databases differ in the way that they handle rumors. Three of the databases (Zephyr, Thomson One, and FactSet) treat rumors as a description of a deal’s status and allow you to screen on this variable. In Zephyr, for example, you can create a set of all deals using “rumor” as the deal’s status, and combine it with variables for geographic location, time period, industry group, and deal type. Bloomberg and S&P Capital IQ, in contrast, handle rumors strictly as a news story event. Both of these databases index a wide variety of news sources for M&A rumors. However, Bloomberg and Cap IQ can’t easily be used to create a customized set of deals combining the concept “rumor” with other variables.

Zephyr is the M&A module of the Bureau van Dijk suite of financial databases. Zephyr categorizes rumors as “current”, “expired,” “updated” and “withdrawn”. Here is the path for finding M&A rumors on Zephyr:

Advanced Search => Rumors => All Rumors => All Current Rumors

Below is a brief spreadsheet report of current M&A rumors from Zephyr. Many additional columns of information relating to the particular deals can be requested although missing data, such as the acquiror name, is a frequent feature of reporting deals based on rumors. Continue reading