It’s a buyer’s market: Using IBISWorld’s Procurement Reports

Whether you’re looking for a basic industry overview, for market research on a niche industry, or for the competitive landscape in a specialized market, you’ve probably looked at an IBISWorld  industry report.  IBISWorld doesn’t just offer market research through their industry reports collection – they also offer research on industry supply chains through their procurement reports. Here’s how you can use IBISWorld‘s procurement reports in your research.

procurement logo

To find procurement reports, go to IBISWorld and click the “Login” button to the right of the “Procurement Reports” banner. (Note: You can only access one of IBISWorld‘s collections at a time. You need to go back to IBISWorld‘s homepage to switch between the Procurement Reports and Industry Reports collections.) Now you can keyword search for a specific report or browse the full report collection.

wind power performanceIBISWorld‘s procurement reports are visually and structurally similar to their industry reports, and the procurement reports offer supply chain information that complements many of the available industry reports. For example, IBISWorld offers industry reports on several aspects of wind energy production, including “Wind Turbine Manufacturing in the US”. This report focuses on industry and company performance, covering industry growth and trends along with major companies operating in this industry.

However, a complementary procurement report on “Turbine Repair and Maintenance” focuses on pricing and buyers who are supporting this industry, covering the average cost of wind turbine repair services and analyzing whether buyers looking for this service are entering a buyer’s or seller’s market. In this case, growth is down in the wind turbine manufacturing industry so there aren’t many new turbines to maintain or repair. But there are a large number of turbine maintenance and repair companies competing for work, so prices for repair and maintenance services are being driven down. In other words, it’s a buyer’s market.

scorecardIBISWorld‘s procurement reports also cover the purchasing process for that industry at the end of each report. This is a valuable instructional section that covers lead time for purchasing a product or service, offers a “Buying-Decision Scorecard” to help decide how much to weight factors like cost and qualifications when choosing a supplier, and includes sample negotiation questions for vetting a potential supplier.

IBISWorld‘s Procurement Reports collection is a great resource for researching company and industry supply chains along with industry dynamics. Looking at a procurement report for an industry alongside its industry report is a great way to look at that industry from another perspective, or to see how different parts of an industry affect each other. Check out the Procurement Reports collection next time you’re looking for industry supply chain information.  If you’re not sure where to start, you can always ask a Lippincott Librarian for help.

What is Your Capital IQ?

SP_Capital_IQ_FINALS&P Capital IQ is a premier financial database used in the industry by leading financial institutions, advisory firms, and corporations. The database covers global public and private companies, investment firms, capital transactions, and people. You can customize reports and export them directly to Excel or use the API to extract data from the database.

We have 8 Capital IQ terminals here at the Lippincott Library. They are located in the Yablon Financial Resources Lab. You need a Wharton username and password to access the database and a librarian to log you in. Full-time Wharton MBAs have remote access to the database though MBA Career Management. Note that access is available only during the school year.

This post focuses on the information available for a single, publicly traded company. While this database does cover privately held companies, the data available for private companies is often minimal because private companies are not required to file with the SEC.

Search

Search by company name in the top toolbar. When you select the company, you will start on the company tearsheet which provides basic qualitative and quantitative information on the firm, including financials, key people, and equity pricing. The left-hand menu allows you to navigate to the different information segments that you can access for the company. Here are some highlights.

Financials/Valuation => Key Stats

The Key Stats page displays high-level financial information for the company you are viewing.  You can view historical financials as well as estimates for data like Total Revenues, Gross Profit, EBITDA, EBIT, Net Income and more. To view historical data (back to the late ’80’s early ’90s), adjust the timeline. Notice that you can easily jump to other financial statements from this screen. The financials can be easily exported to Excel. Select either the single page you are viewing or the entire set of financials. You can also link to the company’s 10-K and 10-Q directly from any financial statement. Continue reading

Bloomberg Highlights: Round 1

Bloomberg HighlightsBloomberg is a key source for current and historical pricing on equities, fixed income securities, foreign exchange and commodities, as well as indicative and fundamental data, customized analytics, and business news. Bloomberg has many supplementary modules that add to its value as a financial resource. This is our first installment of Bloomberg Highlights where we show off some of Bloomberg’s most interesting features.

Bloomberg’s Mapping Module (BMAP)

BMAP allows you to map world wide energy assets (oil, gas fields, pumping stations and pipe lines) and mines (coal, gold and other minerals) as well as individual vessels in ports. Energy assets can be displayed as points on a map or in table format. Below is a map of natural gas pipelines, shown in red, overlaid with US shale basins in blue.

For access, type BMAP and hit the green <GO> key

BMap1

Supply Chain Analysis

Bloomberg provides data (when available) on a company’s suppliers and customers. Use the SPLC function to locate a specific company’s supply chain.  For example, to find Merck’s suppliers, customers, and peers type the following into the command line: Continue reading