The Library is Open!

Hello, Wharton students! Welcome to Lippincott Library and a new academic year. Find us online, chat with us during the day, email us after hours, call us at 215-898-5924 or head up to the second floor of Van Pelt-Dietrich Library and say hello! We’re here to support your research and academic needs. We offer a number of library services to do that.

 

RESEARCH TO GO. Have a question between classes? Visit us in Huntsman Hall! We hold office hours every Monday through Thursday 12:30 – 1:30 in JMHH 251.  Drop in and get quick answers for your job search or research questions.

 

business FAQ

Our Business FAQ is your 24/7 librarian. Search by keyword or concept to find resources on topics such as market research, company financials, analyst reports and more.

DOCUMENT DELIVERY. Available to undergraduate students, MBAs,  PhD candidates and Wharton faculty. Email docdel@wharton.upenn.edu to request articles and book chapters. Include the full citation for the fastest reply.

BUSINESS NEWS. Put away your wallet! Lippincott Library subscribes to major newspapers like the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the New York Times, and many other business periodicals such as the Harvard Business Review and The Economist. You can read them in print in the library or online through several of our databases. You also now have access to WSJ Pro through Factiva. To limit your results to articles from WSJ Pro, click “Search” and then click “Source” below the “Free Text Search” box. Type WSJ Pro in the “Source” search bar and select any WSJ Pro sections of interest.

GROUP STUDY ROOMS.  Have a team project or group presentation?  Reserve a room  for your meeting. We have smaller study rooms for 4-5 people and two larger rooms that accommodate 10-12 people.

YABLON FINANCIAL RESOURCES LAB. Your one-stop-shop for access to Bloomberg and Capital IQ. Yablon is open to Wharton students only whenever Lippincott Library is open, and our librarians are happy to help you with these resources.

WORKSbloomberg120611_2_560HOPS.  On Wednesdays we talk about Bloomberg. Each week we offer Bloomberg training from 3:30 – 4:30 in Yablon Financial Resources Lab. It’s hands-on so be sure to come a few minutes early to create your own Bloomberg account. Register for this and other business workshops here.

 

TEXT BOOKS. We have library copies of textbooks for many Wharton courses on reserve at the Lippincott Services Desk.  Most textbooks can be checked out for three hours and used in the library. Check if we have your textbook in Franklin’s Course Reserves catalog.

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DATAPOINTS is Lippincott Library’s blog. Follow us for tips and tricks about library databases, new resources we’ve added to our collection, and more. And follow us on Twitter @LippincottLib for business news, library workshops, and more.

We hope to see you in Lippincott Library soon!

Bloomberg FX functions part 2: Charting features

In addition to the basic FX functions reviewed in our post on Bloomberg FX functions, Bloomberg also offers its robust charting features for FX functions. These functions are great if you would like a more visual representation of the FX data than the tables provided in the basic functions. Below, we have detailed five different charting functions that are particularly useful for generating charts for FX functions.

Most charting screens are divided into three areas – the control area at the top, the side panel, and the chart itself. The control area and side panel allow you to edit the chart information and add items to the display, such as news events or other additional studies or scenarios.

Line chart

LINE CHART

The GP function produces a line chart that is excellent for visualizing trends for a specific currency pair over time. The default view is one year for the selected currency pair (ex: EURUSD [CURNCY] GP [GO]) If you just type in [CURNCY] GP [GO] the system will automatically default to the last currency pair you were looking at in any currency function.

The line graph displays trading information, as well as an adjustable line chart showing you the historical price information at a glance. The default display is one year of last price information, but you can also choose to display information for the last day or month, year-to-date, along with several other pre-selected options or a custom range. You can also display ask price, bid price, or inverse market price as opposed to the last price. Graphs and their accompanying data cannot be exported to Excel, but can be exported as an image or vector by clicking on Actions. Also, under actions, can view pricing info as a chart. You can also overlay additional currencies by clicking on “Security/Study”, or mark specific events, such as major news affecting one of the countries or regions, by clicking on “Event.” Custom charts can also be saved for future use.

GIP – Line chart for intraday pricing

GIP is another line chart that provides the ability to visualize trends for a currency, specifically for viewing intraday pricing over time. Where the GP only lets you see the last price (or ask price, bid price, etc.) by day, the GIP function let’s you view a currency’s intraday pricing over time up for up to 240 days in the past for a time series alanaysis that allows you to examine security performance.

INTRADAY PRICE CHART

GPC – Candle Chart

GPC displays the candle chart view of the GP (line chart for pricing) function. You can use this to examine trends in intraday pricing over longer periods of time than you can in the regular GP function. This function can be accessed by typing GPC [GO] or select “candle” from the control area in the regular GP function.

 

 

CANDLE CHART2

 

GPO -Bar Chart

GPO is a bar chart that, similar to the candle chart, allows you to examine trends in intraday pricing over longer periods of time. This function can be accessed by typing GPO [GO] or select “bar” from the control area in the regular GP function.

EURUSD BAR CHART

Introduction to Bloomberg FX Functions

If you are interested in foreign exchange rates or other information on world currencies, Bloomberg is an excellent resource for that data. In this blog post, we will go over some of the basic FX functions that are available in Bloomberg.

To get started, hit the yellow [CURNCY] market sector key, and then hit the green [GO] key. This will display a menu of the main currency functions, giving you an overview of some of the options available to you when you are looking for currency and FX data.

One of the main FX functions is FXIP, the FX information portal.

1 - FXIP Screenshot

If you type in FXIP [GO], you will be taken to the FX markets overview screen. FXIP gives you a detailed overview of FX information, enabling you to get a quick snapshot of pricing information for various currency baskets. This is a great starting point for FX overview information before navigating to different screens for more detailed information, some of which are detailed below. The default currency for the FXIP screen is USD, but you are able to change that by typing in a different base currency at the amber box near the top of the screen. You can click on the different gray tabs for additional market overview information.

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Are You Certified??? Certification Programs for Bloomberg or Thomson One!!!

Many students and potential employees like certifications for Bloomberg or Thomson One. This demonstrates that the student has an understanding of how to use these expensive programs before coming on board.  The learning curve for using these products on the job is greatly reduced.

BloombergMonitor

Bloomberg, available at Lippincott Library or Huntman Hall, currently offers two certificates.

Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC) is a self- paced, 8 hour introduction to finance using 70 Bloomberg terminal functions.  This provides a good foundation for undergraduates or people new to finance.  It covers four topics:  Economic Indicators, Currencies, Fixed Income and Equities. The format is interactive video sessions. There is no cost for this certificate if you use the Library Bloomberg terminals.  You can sign up for a web-based session at a discounted price of $149.00.

BESS is also self-paced and is recommended for individuals with more experience in Finance and Bloomberg.  Again, there is no cost when using the Library Bloomberg terminals.  Sessions are based on written materials.

Once in Bloomberg, just type BMC<GO> or BESS<GO> to get started.

Both classes require that you take quizzes in order to get the certificate.

Thomson2

Thomson One Investment Bank also offers a certificate program.  Click here for general information.  Once you have viewed the materials for the modules, request a token to take the exam.  The exam comprises 30 questions.  You have 60 minutes to complete the test.  If you don’t pass the first time, you are allowed to take the test a second time.  It is encouraged that you use Thomson One while taking the test.  This is free to students at Universities which subscribe to Thomson.

Remember that Thomson One only works with IE.  Please refer to these postings for further information.

Thomson One and Compatibility:  Internet Explorer Issues 

Thomson One Compatibility and Chrome or Firefox.

Screening for Alumni-Company Links

Job seekers are often interested in identifying companies that employ alumni from their schools. Here are brief descriptions of four databases that  uncover alumni-company links. The databases report on different although overlapping populations, and vary in the number and type of screening variables they provide. The biographical information given typically includes contact data, employment history, and, if publicly available, compensation.
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Ruble Regression: Exploring Correlations with Bloomberg.

In June 2014, the price of oil began to fall from its high of $115 a barrel. The value of the Russian Ruble, as well as the currencies of all major petroleum exporting countries began to drop along with the price of oil. Bloomberg has several correlation modules that allow us to examine the link between market variables. For example, we can quickly explore the relationship between exchange rates and oil prices using Bloomberg’s HRA program.

To plot the Russian Ruble / US Dollar exchange rate against the price of oil in Bloomberg, type:  HRA <GO>

Ruble regression value latest

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Clean Energy by the Numbers: Data Sources

WRIBusNeedsAccording to Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary of the UN Climate Convention, “Never before have the risks of climate change been so obvious and the impacts so visible.” We could add that never before has there been such an interest in sources of information for climate change, energy use and “clean” (non-polluting)  technology.

 

 

In a previous blog post, Clean, Green, and Renewable Energy.  Are there any Alternatives? we described several  resources for  Penn students that cover clean technology. Here are some additional data sources on clean technology that may prove useful.

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What’s it worth to you? Company Valuation Resources

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Contributors:  Cynthia L. Cronin-Kardon and Mia Wells

Valuation is used in business to determine the price participants are willing to pay or receive to buy or sell a business. Needless to say, the seller is looking to make as much profit on the deal as possible while the buyer hopes to pay as little as possible. Various resources can help determine the best price for the transaction. Listed below are some Lippincott Library resources to help students with assignments for a number of Wharton courses including FNCE207/728 – Corporate Valuation (which also has a course guide); FNCE250/750 – Venture Capital & the Finance of Innovation; and FNCE251/751 – Finance of Buyouts & Acquisitions.


 

Comparable Deals
You’ll want to search for precedent transactions in the industry of the company you are valuing. Several sources allow you to search for comps by industry (SIC code, NAICS code, or alphabetically by name).

BizComps is a database of business sale statistics which are based on small business sales transaction data. After searching by SIC or NAICS code, you’ll be presented with a list of recent deals. Select those of interest and you can run a “Transaction Analysis,” which will give summary statistics/multiples on the deals you’ve chosen. Ask to be logged in by a librarian at our Reference Desk.bizcompsborder

 

Business Valuations by Industry is a print source available at Lippincott Library ReferenceBusValIndusMerged Desk (call number HG4028.V3 B78). It includes detailed studies of actual mergers and acquisitions, including deal “tearsheets”. This source is arranged by industry and includes actual transactions from 2007 through 2009. Profiles of buyers are included as well as some some foreign transactions and deal terminations. This is a great resource when you want to profile selected, covered deals.

 

 

 

Betas
Beta measure the volatility of an industry or company within the market as a whole. Betas help to calculate the risk of an investment.

Industry BetasFor industry betas, use the Ibbotson SBBI Valuation Yearbook, a print guide held at our Reference Desk (call number HG4028.V3 S86).

 

companybetaCompany betas are in Bloomberg, available in the Yablon Financial Resources Lab here in Lippincott, or the Forum level of Huntsman Hall. Search for a company of interest and run the Beta function by typing BETA <Go>.

 

 

Best practices
It’s always smart to look to the experts for advice – these sources will give you tips and tricks when performing a valuation for a company within a certain industry.

BusRefGuidemerge
Business Reference Guide is a print source located at Lippincott Library Reference Desk (HD1393.25 .B87). This source provides several types of information which can be used for pricing businesses and franchises.  It is organized by industry and includes industry statistics from IBISWorld, “rules of thumb” by industry analysts, pricing tips, benchmarks, commentary, expenses as a percentage of annual sales and industry costs.

 

 

Standard & Poor’s Net Advantage provides industry surveys. One unique feature of this source the section included for every industry on “How to Analyze a Company in this

S&PIndustry”. To access this, click on Industries, select the survey of interest. Next scroll to the chapter titled, “How to Analyze a(n) […] Company,” which also contains a section on Equity Valuation as well as a glossary of industry terminology.

 

 

 

Company multiples
To track multiples of a company over time, use the sources listed below. This will help you price out the company itself or help you to compare it against a similar firm.

Multiples_VinceS&P Capital IQ provides lots of financial data including multiples. MBAs can access CapIQ via MBA Career Management, while Wharton undergraduates can come to the Yablon Financial Resources Lab and ask to be logged in by a librarian. Search for a public company of interest and look for Financials/Valuation in the left menu. You can change the date range to see multiples over time, as well.

 

BloomFA

Bloomberg is available in the Yablon Financial Resources Lab or the Forum level of Huntsman Hall. Search for a company of interest and run the Financial Analysis function by typing FA <Go>. Look for the Enterprise Value tab.

 

Past M&A deal tearsheets
You may find it helpful to look for past deals to get a sense of how many deals a company has done in the past, what were the specifics of a deal or how active the M&A market is in a certain industry.

Thomson ONE – note that this resource only loads with full functionality when using Internet Explorer. Once inside, scroll over Screening & Analysis, then Deals & League Tables, then M&A to select either a Quick Search or Advanced Search.

Zephyr – select Zephyr Advanced. Pick the variables to define your search. Below is a screenshot of a list of deals. You can click on any of these to get a detailed summary of the deal.Zephyr

This post may have additional information – What’s the Deal? Researching Specific M&A Deals

 

 

 

 

MSCR – Bloomberg’s Municipal Bond Screening Function

Bloomberg’s MSCR function allows you to search a file of more than a million outstanding municipal bonds based on criteria of your choice.

The main search screen shows a search for bonds issued by Philadelphia institutions of higher education.

msrc screen ok

The spreadsheet below gives a page of the resulting list using the default headings. A 154.75 million dollar bond by the University of Pennsylvania is highlighted. Clicking on a row in the spreadsheet allows the display of additional bond details.

Univ PA lisrt

The first page of a description of the Penn Bond is shown.

Penn bond detail

The columns in the output can be edited. For example, for a spreadsheet showing the bonds issued by municipalities with a Moody’s rating of below investment grade (Ba1 to C) we would want a column showing the Moody rating associated with each bond.  Search variables are not automatically added as columns in the display. To add a column or columns, follow this sequence:

Actions => Edit => Display

Choose variables wanted and click APPLY

For more on Bloomberg’s functions, take a look at the blogs in our Bloomberg category and our Bloomberg Help Guide.